TCWT Blog Chain Post: July 2014

Hey! I’m doing the blog chain again! This month’s prompt is: What’s one thing you wish you knew when you started writing?

I started writing when I was in third grade (I think- it might’ve been fourth grade because my school looped, meaning we had the same teachers for two years). The project was to write and illustrate a book to read to the class and the parents. Most of the kids wrote three, maybe four pages. I wrote twelve. Front and back. When I read it, the class decided that it was the best one. And they didn’t change their minds.

I found the little book again a few years later, in sixth grade. I had been going through my ‘memory box,’ which is where my mom and I put special things from my childhood that we want to save. I re-read it and got so many ideas about expanding it and turning it into a novel that I decided to do just that. The Crystal Guardians: Book One doesn’t really look anything like The Diamond Of Light, the story I wrote in third grade, but it has the same characters, and roughly the same goal. Of course, I’ve added a bunch of characters, but the original ones are still the main protagonists.

That reminds me- I really should start rewriting it again….

Anyways, I’d always been good at writing, whether it be essays, letters, or descriptive language exercises, but I never considered putting all of my ideas onto paper before. My biggest regret is that during those years before sixth grade, I never really wrote down any of my ideas. I might’ve wrote down a couple, but many went to waste, lost in the archives of my mind. I’ll probably never get them back. That kills me.

There’re a lot of things I wish I knew when I really started writing in sixth grade. First, I wish I’d known that, more than four years later, I still haven’t been able to stick with a book. Curse you, ADHD and tiny attention span! I bet if I’d known that, I would’ve tried harder to focus. I’m not saying it would’ve changed anything, but hey, we can always hope that it will (because when someone invents a time machine, I’ll totally go tell my sixth grade self to get a move on!)

I also wish I’d known about that promise I made to the bishop in my letter I wrote for Confirmation. You know, the whole I-promise-to-be-a-published-author-before-I’m-eighteen thing? Actually, you probably don’t know about that, because I just looked back through my previous posts, and it’s not there. I guess I never published it. Oops!

Anyways, we all had to write letters to the bishop before being Confirmed. At the end of my letter, I wrote something like, “Just so I can have more motivation, I’ll tell you that I promise to be a published author before I’m eighteen.” So, not only did he read it himself, at the Confirmation mass, he was reading some excerpts of our letters, and he was like, “good luck to this person,” and read that. I was like, face-palm. I’m surprised my mom didn’t just die right there 🙂 Oh yeah, and he also accidentely gave away my birthday, so now the whole church knew who wrote it, because who else has a birthday of September 11 who wants to write for a living? I’m the only one in my church.

I wish I knew about that because I totally would’ve focused a hell of a lot more before I was fifteen!

There are a bunch of other things I wish I’d known, but the last big one is this: I wish I’d known that it’s better to show the draft to people and get advice than to hide it because you’re too afraid that you’ll get made fun of. That’s a big one that I think everyone should know, no matter how old or experienced they are. That is probably one of the golden rules of writing right there. You’ll never get published if you don’t have someone to fix the plot holes, mechanics, plain-old screw-ups, and all the other stuff that’s wrong. You need more than just one pair of eyes. Nine or ten is optimal.

Alright, I need to go write. Although there’s no way I’m winning Camp NaNoWriMo this month (I’ve given up trying to work against the world and find time), that doesn’t mean I can’t just work on my writing. Bye!

-Sam

 

Participants In The Chain

TCWT Blog Chain Post: June 2014

Hey! So, the blog chain is back again this month! This month’s prompt is: What are your thoughts on movie-to-book adaptations? Would you one day want your book to be made into a movie, or probably not?

This is a really interesting topic, one that I’ve thought about many times, probably because of all the crappy adaptations I’ve seen. Let me start with the absolute worst movie-to-book adaptation ever: the Percy Jackson and the Olympians movies.

First of all, can I just say that they’re supposed to be 12 years old, not 16. Now, that might be easier to overcome if the whole freaking plot wasn’t about Percy turning 16! I mean, c’mon now. When he turns 16, the prophesy is fulfilled. How the hell is that possible if he’s already 16 in the first movie?!

Sorry. Kinda lost it there. Anyways, another movie-to-book adaptation that irks me is the Harry Potter series. And not because of the main plots, but because he had blue eyes in the movie. Like, really guys, you couldn’t have given Daniel Radcliffe color contacts? I literally yell at the TV “NO HE DOESN’T!” anytime the Harry Potter movies are on and someone says, “Oh, Harry, you have your mother’s eyes,” (seriously, ask my mom- it annoys the hell out of her, and has earned me some groundings before).

Don’t even get me started on A Series of Unfortunate Events. First, can I ask why they would put three books into one movie when movies can never cover one full book? And it were really inaccurate. Also, because of the whole three-books-one-movie thing, it missed a lot of things. No. Just, no.

Anyways, I’ve yet to find a movie that meets my expectations from the book. Although Harry Potter is fairly accurate with the storyline, I still can’t get past the whole blue-eyes thing. So, I really don’t think the book-to-movie adaptations are good. At all.

That being said, if someone wanted to make a movie out of my book, that would be the highlight of my life right there. Yes, I know I’m being a little hypocritical here, but I’m holding on to the delusional hope that my book-to-movie adaptation would be different than all the rest.

Plus, it’d be freaking awesome to see my book title on the theater preview signs.

I guess because it’s made into a movie, that would mean my book is a hit. It’s awesome by everyone else’s terms, not just my own. And that’s really an amazing thought.

Alright, I’m trying to figure out more to say, but I really can’t explain it better than that. Plus, I have to go work on my Dos quarter project. Bye!

-Sam

P.S. Sorry to those of you who are in a different time zone than me, and who waited for all of their day for this post. While I am getting this up at around 7 for my time zone, I’m sure there are some of you who are already into the early morning of June 8.

 

Participants In The Chain

TCWT Blog Chain Post: May 2014

Hey! So, I’m taking part in a blog chain, found here. The prompt is: What kinds of published books would you like to see more of? Hmmmm….

Well, I think I’m going to start with being very specific. There’s this series I read when I was in, like, 5th grade or something like that that had a horrible ending, at least for me. I absolutely hate books that leave everything open at the end. The series I’m specifically talking about right now is Chasing Yesterday.

It pretty much ended like any book would, but paving the way for at least one more book, if not two or three. It’s as if the author was like, “well, I want it to be a trilogy, so I’m just going to just stop writing now.” I HATED IT SO MUCH! I’m not going to give anything away, because it’s actually a pretty good series, so you should read it, but the ending sucks.

Now, going wayyy more general. I wish there were more books written from a guy’s point of view. I mean, I already know how girls think- I am one (not a typical one, to be sure, but I have Gabby for the “typical” stuff). I really liked Allegiant (excuse me while I go sob in a corner at the mention of it) from Tobias’ point of view. I just wish it was for a different reason… CURSE YOU VERONICA ROTH!

The books I’ve started writing (there’s probably about 50+ of them) are actually pretty even, with a handful having a guy narrator, and the rest a girl’s point of view. It’s just so much more interesting when authors mix it up. I’m so tired of hearing about a girl, with a little romance problems, who has to change worlds or something like that (going with dystopian novels here). There’s so much more out there!

One thing that ticks me off is when people say to not focus on describing the characters, to let the readers develop their own image in their heads. That’s a little hypocritical, because everyone’s always like, “DETAIL!!!” Plus, I like the book to paint a picture in my mind, don’t you? Anyways, I just want your opinions on this because my friend and I got into an argument about it the other day.

Alright, I need to go finish some homework 😦 I’m looking forward to everyone else’s posts! Good luck!

-Sam

 

Participants In The Chain: